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's first field secretary in mississippi. he had fought for his country in world war ii. before coming home to fight for justice here. his assassination by a white supremacist in june of 1963 helped to inspire the march on washington. joining me now is myrlie evers williams, the widow of medgar evers and a legendary civil rights leader in her own right. and historian taylor branch author of the trilogy of books on dr. king and the civil rights movement. thank you both for being on tonight. >> it's a pleasure. >> thank you. >> let me start with you ms. evers williams. your husband was killed in june of '63, and it was part of what really ignited the movement that had already started around having this march. you were the speaker at that march and didn't make it. and one of the things we're most proud of is tomorrow you're going to make that speech at lincoln memorial for the march on washington. >> well, thank you. >> 50 years later. >> thank you ever so much. >> tell us what was running through your mind as you fought in mississippi and the climate in 1963. because i don't think people unde
jackson mississippi, good morning. yes, i am a conservative republican from mississippi. i agree with the doctor earlier. i think obamacare is very bad. it is going to go down naturally. i am not for a government shutdown i am for tying it to and doing asing the conservative republicans will done. i think we ought to way entitlements and electric public and in 2014. i am not for a government shutdown and i am not for obamacare. i am tying it to the debt ceiling. host: that is the strategy as far as speaker boehner is concerned. caller: i think that is what we should do. eastern and central time zones and mountain pacific time zones are the options. the numbers are on your screen, you can call the one that best represents you. for and worth -- foreign affairs released a story in the washington post this morning, talking about a reunion of families on both sides in korea -- calls, this is john from idaho, good morning. i believe that republicans are missing an opportunity right now to win if wehe government and make president obama passed the health care and not give people voucher
of the rain stays east of the mississippi and more severe storms headed into the northeast on friday. and we get rid of everything on saturday. saturday looks better in the northeast. if you are going to jones beach and along the cape, 81 in boston. it will be nice for saturday. showers in the mid atlantic all the way back here along the mississippi. still dry across the west with the exception of areas across northern washington and northern montana. 83 in kansas city on sunday. we dry out in the nation's midsection. on monday we are looking at showers in arkansas, oklahoma, down in the southeast. still 78 in chicago. we're not shaking the cooler than average weather around the great lakes. 96 in salt lake city. wednesday looks quiet with the exception of the southeast. what's new? you can get the latest weather weekday mornings on wake up with al at 5:30. ♪ [ bats squealing ] we weren't really morning people. we're vampires after all. then we tried this nutri-grain fruit crunch bar. it's so crunchy. crunchy granola, mmmm... made with real fruit, 20 grams of whole grains. now, we love mor
was not mentioned. even though in mississippi where i was working, only 3% of the black people were registered. 40% of the population and incidentally, because of our work and working with other people, mississippi had the largest number of elected officials, but now, we're here 50 years later and we find in washington that more than in 1953. more people out of work, but more importantly, we went free in 1963. we need state hood. state hood. >> better jobs, better pay was an objective in 1963. a long time before voting rights legislation would come about, but many are crediting the march to having to expedite that, so what are you hoping comes after this 50-year mark of this march? the march did sort of spur us on and lighten our spirit, but we went to work the next week in mississippi and alabama and georgia, et cetera, so what i hope this march will do is let us know the struggle is not over. there's still massive discrimination, unemployment, gaps between the white and black students and it would spur us on to stop being so complacent, but from my point in washington, state hood is my number on
of us were arrested and jailed in mississippi during the freedom ride. a bus was set on fire in alabama. we were beaten and arrested and jailed, but we helped bring them in to segregation in public transportation. i came back here again in june of 196 1963 as the new chairmanf the student non-violent committee. we met with president kennedy, who said the frustration throughout america. in 1963 we cannot because of the color of our skin. we had t to pay a tax, pass a tt because of the color of our skin and pass a vote in jelly beans in a jar. thousand of people were arrested trying to participate in the integration process. many innocent were killed in mississippi, and that's why we told president kennedy we intended to march on washington to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in america. on august 28, 1963, the nation's capitol was in a state of emergency. thousands of troops surroundedded this city, little stores were closed, but the march was so orderly, so peaceful it was filled with dignity and self-respect because we believe in a way of peace, the way of l
nonviolent coordinating committee in greenwood, mississippi. she was on the staff of the march of washington. also, kweisi mfume. and the national editor for "vanity fair," the author of the upcoming book, "an idea whose time has come, two presidents, two parties and the battle for the civil rights act." thank you for joining me. congresswoman, i want to start with you. you have probably some very distinct memories. i was talking about the fact that for people who experienced it, it probably feels like yesterday. for people born after 1963, it feels like ancient history. take us to washington 1963 on that august day. >> well, 1963 was the high point of the civil rights movement in many ways. haven't worked on the staff of the march, being young and foolish, i expected a whole lot of people to come. but nobody really knew how many would come. what was really challenging was the unprecedented nature of the march. there had never been a mass march in washington, much less for civil rights. so if people asked me about what was the -- what do you remember most, frankly, it was not necessarily the
from grand central west the place that will be the biggest building west of mississippi where high-speed rail will be there so transportation can bring all of the people from all over california to compliment the style of those two towers arrest i'm looking forward of seeing the design and the architect terry. i'm trying to not miss pronounce that name. but i will say too it's more meaningful to have partner particle from china. that's meaningful to me it will represent our future in tourism in the enlightened challenge of students and there the leadership will open up a lot of conversations with our businesses and argue resident in china to compliment what's going on in san francisco. i can't wait to see those up and in 2015 will be here how we work with all our agencies the particular reason to the d b i and the oothsz other agencies to make sure we compliment not only great transportation and neighborhoods this will be so inspiring for the rest of the country. congratulations to the partnership with china and also carl thank you for being such a great partner. you were there whe
away to the natchez-mississippi area, the territory. and lived together and later claimed they were married. during the campaign, it became a real issue and jackson never got over it because he said it killed her ultimately. all her life, she was embarrassed by it. she was a pioneer woman, she smoked a pipe, a corn cob pipe. and was a very excellent plantation manager. but the public side of things, no. and she was very, very hurt by it. now, judge overton, the best friend of the family, wrote an essay about the scandal of the not being married because they did remarry. he advised them to marry when jackson became famous and that was back in tennessee. the judge said the whole detail. he gets up. goes to mississippi, to natchez. as they say, they were married. he wouldn't go any further than that. >> what did andrew jackson do the rest of his term? two terms, really? as far as the first lady? >> for a hostess? he had his wife's niece for the second administration. she died in the second administration. she was popular. but she left over the flutter of the margaret o'neill scandal of
times" about growing up with their single moms in mississippi and making the tough choice to go off to harvard and yale. yes, for them it was a very different choice than it is for most students. it wasn't an easy thing to do. you'll hear their stories coming up. go anywhere in the world, but you had to leave right now, would you go? man: 'oh i can't go tonight' woman: 'i can't.' hero : that's what expedia asked me. host: book the flight but you have to go right now. hero: (laughs) and i just go? this is for real right? this is for real? i always said one day i'd go to china, just never thought it'd be today. anncr: we're giving away a trip every day. download the expedia app and your next trip could be on us. expedia, find yours. from capital one... boris earns unlimited rewards for his small business. can i get the smith contract, please? thank you. that's three new paper shredders. [ boris ] put 'em on my spark card. [ garth ] boris' small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase every day. great businesses deserve unlimited rewards. read back the chicken's testimony, please
is recognizing our rights. that's something that's never happened in the whole history of mississippi my country. me and my partner says we are people that have dignity and respected that's a what this means (clapping) and i know that mayor newsom or governer likes the word extra ordinary but the country is sending a message because lgbt community that their rights were not ongoing by now they have to pay attention. we're now going to end with marriage equality there has to be equality for all of us including our transgender brothers and sisters. we're not leaving anyone behind this is only the beginning. thank you so much let's keep fighting. (clapping) >> his leadership has been extraordinary not only in his district it's going to be the site of a tremendous celebration this evening so have fun but really citywide and really statewide seeing as a tremendous leader supervisor scott wiener (clapping). >> thank you. thank you although the voters are annoy my - i want to thank my former boss city attorney dennis herrera. i remember back almost a decade ago from the very first moment he was there
's not a pretty picture. here's just one example. three men on a summer's day in mississippi. why are they smiling and what are they really up to? yes, that's former president bill clinton on the right and on the left, his best friend forever, terry mcauliffe, former chairman of the democratic national committee, fundraiser supreme for both bill and hillary, and the personification of the corporate wing of the democratic party. smack in the middle, that's haley barbour, former chairman of the republican national committee. he made a fortune lobbying for corporations, especially for the ta backco industry, then went home to serve two terms as governor of mississippi, and couldn't wait to get back to washington, where once again, he's gun-slinging for the big boys. so why did these three d.c. desperadoes ride into a small mississippi town? seems that when barbour was governor, he offered mcauliffe a very attractive state package of price and tax subsidies for a plant there to build electric cars for his greentech automotive company. mcauliffe also tapped his politically connected network for more th
old housing stock. we have the oldest housing stock this side of mississippi. and that's where our problems are most likely to be. >> i going to test the microphone and ask people how you expect your home to perform. >> anybody who wants to share. tell us, what kind of building. do you live in a wood frame >> yes >> after a major earthquake. what's your expectation. >> i am afraid from last year's earthquake class, you mentioned. the house might pop to the street because my garage is empty. >> is it in the middle of the block? >> middle. >> there's less chance. sir, what kind of building do you live in? >> i live in an apartment if ground floor parking. >> in the middle of the block, corner. >> corner. >> are there openings on both sides? >> yes. on both sides. >> it's a wood framed building? >> it seems to be a hybrid. with concrete and steel and wood frame on top of that. >> we don't often see that. modern buildings have a podium. >> what neighborhood are you in >> dolores park. >> you will hit the lake. if are in the dolores, you are in pretty good shape. >> what is your expecta
. the sad thing when i was in the georgia legislature we used to say thank god for mississippi because mississippi was always worse than georgia. now we have to say thank god for north carolina because north carolina has become the new mississippi. >> you know, brian, let's talk about north carolina. north carolina up until recently was seen as a sort of a bastion of progressism of the south. yet north carolina now is not exactly a bastion of anything progressive. >> no. i think that's right. one of the scary things for people who are committed to civil rights in this country is that the pace of which we have retreated from basic protections. what i'm most concerned about is these legislatures a lot of them in the south and other parts of the country actually take pride in their resistance to responding to the challenges that face people of color, that face the poor, that face the disadvantaged. they are proud of the fact that they are creating barriers to voting. in north carolina there was something called the racial justice act that was design to deal with the horrific disparities w
in mississippi to senator john stennis. in the presidential party were bob haldeman and john ehrlichman. >> we were on air force one. we were going off to dedicate a john stennis memorial rocket launcher or something in mississippi. and i'm standing on the flight deck, and it occurred to me for about 30 seconds that i could crash this airplane and that would put an end to everybody's problems. mine, nixon's and haldeman's, everybody who was aboard. i stepped off that airplane, and usually the drill is richard nixon steps off the airplane and all the cameras click away and all that. he got off and nobody paid any attention to him. i got off and boy, they were all taking morgue shots. >> in the very last conversation i had with him there, we were talking about this break-in, in california. the elsberg psychiatrist break-in. and he said, i didn't know about that, did i? and i had to indicate to him that he did know about it. >> that, of course, is a totally out of our -- have you ever heard of this? >> yes, sir. >> i never heard of it, john. i should have been told about that, shouldn't i? >> i'm
and thunderstorms east of the mississippi. and the heaviest, from new york down to the carolinas. >> upper 70s from boston to new york. 80s in the midwest. 90s in the southeast. triple digits for dallas and phoenix. >>> innovative fast food. wait until you see the breakfast treat taco bell is rolling out in more areas. >> it's a good one. >>> plus, a hot air balloon plummets to the ground with an american family onboard. and the prominent california man killed in the crash. >>> a heart scare for george w. bush. the former president waking up in a hospital. why doctors decided to operate >>> checking out to be another nervous day on wall street, as stocks open lower for the second-straight day. the dow lost 93 points on fears that the federal reserve could begin pulling back on its massive infusion of cash that's been so popular with traders. >>> the feds are going after bank of america as the government tries to clean up the behavior that led to the great recession. the justice department is suing b of a for allegedly lying to investors about the risks of the toxic loans that led to the housing col
carolina, north carolina, texas, mississippi, colorado. i don't know, pretty red states. unfriendliest, new jersey, california, michigan. >> liberal, liberal. >> go to mississippi for vacation. >> oakland is a beautiful city that is rotten. it is rotten because of liberal policy. >> i want to agree with my colleague here from wherever he is from. you are right. if you look at just the crime rates i would bet you the crime rates up against you would find a direct correlation. >> and economic freedom. if you look at a person's ability to start a business and sustain. if you go to places like in the top ten you will have that opportunity plus i think the weather is great in sonoma, california. >> the weather is great in oakland. >> it is because it is unfriendly. >> right to work states. no taxation. >> that's what they stop and think about because they are happier. they don't pay taxes. they don't have to pay union dues. >> can you blame detroit for being unfriendly? >> i wouldn't want there to be a city. >> i wouldn't want to live there. also, albany has the state government of new york. so
, and areas that are in mississippi and alabama, as much as six to ten inches of rain over the next five days, enough to cause flooding concerns. mara's already complained offair but it's a chilly morning in the northeast and the great lakes. >> it's like fall. i have my sweater under the desk, it's chilly. >> 24 hours ago i opened the windows in my house and last night i had to shut them. >> some people love it, but i say let summer run its course. >>> prince william prepares caring for his newborn to military duty. >>> who are the highest players in the nfl this year? >>> and a new study that shows which drivers are jerks. right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. hp moonshot. it's time to build a better enterprise. together. cheryl burke is cha-cha-ing in depend silhouette briefs for ch
the flooding on the other sidle of the country tonight. this is from biloxi, mississippi, the truck tearing through the water there. and from panama city, florida, tonight, this apartment complex, completely flooded out. and ginger, these totals are really something. >> this is beyond the annoyance level and now it's to almost dangerous. people are losing their property. and places like gulfport, mississippi, today, six inches in less than two hours, so, it comes down fast and, i wish i could tell you it's over, but it's not. that stationary front still sitting there for the next two days at least. however much rain does it mean? two to three inches in the red zone, from mobile into parts of the florida panhandle, right there, just north of atlanta. >> all right, ginger zee with the whole picture tonight. ginger, thank you. >>> now to the spike in bear attacks we told you about last night here. this is the time of year when they start preparing for hibernation, looking for food. and tonight here, the 12-year-old girl attacked in michigan, describing the horror for the first time. here's abc
name down on the lower left, mississippi. the number next to the city is the derivative of the gps marker for this google location and i sort of transposed the numbers and used that. i wanted to connotate that virtual world and also there was a visual connection to the photographic heritage that was pretty wild. on top of this moment in time, there is also a breaking down of the imagery thaps in the google pictures themselves, most of these are lo fi and i chose that i guess because of the esthetics. it did not contain the same look as these and it also erode the truth and makes the lens a little bit blurry, it alters things from a technical point of view. so, you could see these pictures that sort of describe them as drive-by pictures that we are drive-by really captures this and not necessarily immersive in any way. it is literally a car driving by capturing a moment. some of this has been done in the past, walker evans took pictures out of a moving vehicle. in fact, strangely, right upstairs in the library before this talk i was looking through my side and i have on there a gall
dead. >> and moving up the gulf coast to gulfport mississippi church goers gathered in the building on the building's steps as the church became an island to the massive flooding in the mississippi streets the high waters also stranded drivers and flooding homes and businesses. one man who was responding to the rising flood watters says thinks the worse in 20 years adding even hurricane katrina back in 2005 didn't cause anything like the flooding they are seeing right now. we have been having some mild temperatures here lately mike masco but you say things are changing. >> it could be a whole lot worse. look what's going on to the west. this is pretty easy the forecast. the only issue this morning i could see happening is is a little fog. north and west of the city out in frederick hagerstown some of the visibilities coming down to five miles zero visibility 10 miles a little patchy fog and it's into the upper 50s north of the beltway close to 70 downtown and 60. s along the bay -- 60s along the bay front. we expect scattered showers this afternoon. it's not a downpour or washout bu
on the other side of the country this evening, images from mississippi here. trucks right there going straight through the water. and from panama city, florida, images coming in. apartment complex there, just completely under water. these totals are really something. >> in gulfport, mississippi, they've had six inches in two hours. and it's not over. i wish this thing would move, but the front is sitting right there. this goes through wednesday. you're going to have although two to three inches, if you are anywhere from mobile, in through southern parts of alabama there, into the panhandle of florida. and atlanta gets back into that surge of moisture. they've seen way too much rain. not only this month, but this year and there's more to come as we go through the week. >> all right, ginger zee, thank you. >>> now, to the spike in bear attacks we told you about last night re. this is the time of year when they start preparing for hibernation, looki for food. tonight here, the 12-year-old girl attacked in michigan, describing the horror for the first time. here's abc's linzie janis now. >> report
, deep south, mississippi, wisdom. red states say caramel. >> i see illinois is a faded pink. >> right along the mississippi. depends on where you grew up. no right way. it has to do with local dialect. >> i figured it was a northern vs. southern. >> i have more maps. here is your next map, part of the country all in map referring to "sub" saying getting a sandwich and in the other part they call it a "hoaggie." >> that's right. >> next one, this is the difference between soda or pop. >> i know this one. >> in red include here in d.c. and dmv, we call it "soda." blue they call it "pop" and green they refer to it by the soda's name, coke or rc cola. >> drink. >> you would never specify? >> that is what i remember down south. >> that could mean a lot of things. >> all right. this is, again american dialect, all the states in red when they are talking about a group of people, you all. what do the folks in green states say? >> you all is proper. >> how do you say it, wisdom? >> y'all. >> it depends where you came from. >> detroit an detroit? >> there are a whole bunch of maps. go to myfoxd
. and then mississippi burning. wait until you hear hal scarpa senior is the gatt this of the mississippi burning portrayed in that movie which they happen. scarpa see at various nicknames. they call them the killing machine. he reveled in this. he felt that he had a license to kill. he would sign notes cayenne, killing machine. they called him the grim reaper, hannibal lector, the mad hatter. he had various names. he stopped counting after 50 murders, which makes him the most prolific killer in the history of cosa nostra, bar none and it makes him one of the top zero colors of all time, by the way. anyway, he only did 30 days in 30 years in prison. why? because from 1962 forward he was the top echelon criminal informants for the fbi. his briefing memos went directly to j. edgar hoover himself. over the years three separate organized crime strike forces, one in newark, one in chicago, one in brooklyn tried to put them away. could people are trying to get this mad dog killer of the street. other members of the fbi you are protecting him and keeping it on the street. these are a couple of the homic
i. once we got past 63 and 64 in saint augustine when the mob turned on the press and in mississippi when people like all good got fired by abc because he would not cover -- abc was still running the story, forgive me, that these three civil rights workers were hiding to get attention and he knew that they had been killed. he lost his job over that. i had to pull nelson at and out of a mob in saint augustine to keep them from being enough. a danish reporter got hit in the camera either by a baseball at and knocked his eye socket out. it was ruthless and brutal for the press. press.s the national the written press never quite believed what they saw. to have press conferences at 9:00 in the morning to say what we were going to do and then the demonstrations would start around 1030 and that 1:00, we would tell them what we did, why we did it, and we would answer questions but they would still -- they could not believe that martin luther king was as , as much of aent selfless man that he actually was. >> in 1961, may 20, when we arrived in montgomery during the freedom ride at the greyho
on to help a student at howard and quote came out for students to go to mississippi because of the work that was going on there. i had seen some -- i had attended a deposition in washington and folk from mississippi and things they had suffered. this elderly man, hartman, talked about what happened on the bus. i was a student. all of the students were coming from all over the country. i was the black student and the student leadership at howard said we have to get there and be there with others. so i went to mississippi that summer of 1964 and i lived with a family. ms.johnson, her daughter was a teenager, june johnson and had been beaten in wynonna, mississippi. june was a strong girl. the family was strong there were about 12 children in the family. they took in three of us. two white girls and myself. host: ruth thanks for the call and thank you for sharing your story from 50 years ago. owen ullmann, we talked about your own participation. walk us through how you arrived here and why you came? guest: my parent has raised me and i'm proud of their values of stressing the importance
, who recently had some heart treatment. let's go to mississippi. laura from ocean springs, mississippi. i am 45 years old. when barack obama talked about education. they discussed how blacks and whites could not go to the same school. thes a graduate from university of south alabama. i was able to graduate from there with a bachelors. >> what did you get your degree in? >> i got my degree in exercise science. work on atrying to masters, but i have been sick. i will have surgery in september. i will try to finish up with a masters in education. >> good luck to you, thank you for joining us. florida, next up. >> how are you doing? listen, i wanted to commend you guys and congratulate you for an awesome broadcast. such a remarkable speech by such a remarkable character. encourage.mber to some of the members of congress commenting about the days activities. here here is senator casey from pennsylvania. this is kay granger of texas. what dreams do you have for your country? the culmination of a movement that began here in montgomery 50 years before. here is california, good evening, stephen
. in texas and mississippi, north carolina and florida, groups are already devising creative ways to make it difficult for minorities, each of us, to vote. in texas, they have already done it. this assault on freedom should be taken as seriously as you have taken anything. any changes to our voting process should be enacted to make voices heard. just simply being able to vote. i have asked the senate judiciary committee to examine these dangerous voting suppression efforts and discuss steps the senate can make to preserve the right of every person to cast a ballot. [applause] on the day the civil rights act was signed into law, president lyndon johnson warned the struggle for equality was not nearly over. here is what he said. "those who founded our country knew that freedom would be secure only if each generation fought." now our generation of americans have been called on to the search of justice. he is sure right. those words are written -- are a reminder to a new generation that freedom must be tended to in order -- for us to grow. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the honorable mit
picky about where it breeds. >> all 100 of those frogs are here, in mississippi. >> it was only one breeding pond known to exist, which was in harrison county, mississippi, and it had not been seen in louisiana since 1967. people kind of laughed, that frog is way over in mississippi, they've seen him, how did he swim across three rivers, cross three interstates and end up over here. >> the designated land in louisiana is privately owned and has been in one family for generations. >> it's land that my family has owned for well over 100 jeers, it's an actively managed tree farm. my great grandfather started a lumber company after the civil war. he built a lumber railroad in these areas in order to bring the timber down. we are standing right now in the middle of an area of about 1500 acres the fish and wildlife service has certified is a critical habitat for frogs that have not been here for many, many years, the frogs need certain elements to live. one of them is a pond. the fish and wildlife service says this is one of these ponds. now it renders his land worthless to potential deve
in mississippi. there was a fear that somebody would get the idea the connecticut of the players. because in some ways these players were civil rights workers. in so most of the players, including the rights players, did not deal very much with the community at large. there really didn't. there were there to play ball. there were not big thinkers. maybe one of them once. >> did you happen to see the jackie robinson from an 42? >> i like to the lot, and i would probably be the most cynical of all. >> i was curious about it because he said the manager brought these guys and because it was a financial decision, a business decision. that was the same theme from 42. analysts is curious about the. seventeen years had passed. was is still a financial thing really or was it just -- >> row, what he said it was -- he had been dead for 20 years, so i did not get to interview him. he did not need the money personally. he was more of the richest as in town. he made in the timber industry. i don't think personally it would be doing something that was right. he loved baseball. a but being a baseball player at t
louisiana's northeast border near mississippi. alina, what you can tell us? >> reporter: zoraida, this is still a very active scene. we're going to zoom into the bank so you can see the police remain here. investigators continue to comb the bank for vefd. now louisiana state police have identified the alleged hostage-taker as 20-year-old fuaed abdo ahmed. authorities say ahmed walked into this tensas state bank with a gun and took three employees hostage-over the course of 12 you hours, ahmed made several demands, even leased a female hostage. just before midnight, local time, a s.w.a.t. team stormed the bank because the gunman, according to police, threatened to kill the hostages. ahmed was shot dead. police say he shot dead both hostages before he was killed. the man and women were taken to separate hospitals in the area. at last check, according to police, they are listed in critical condition, zoraida. >> alina, thank you very much. we'll continue to check in with you there. >>> we're going to turn now to cairo, we have majoring troubling developments overnight. police have m
of mississippi where races suffocating part of everyday life. cory's version of the best was yet no idea these were police. he shot and fired one of these figures to protect himself and his daughter and as soon as he realized, surrendered in chapters 10 to three bullets left in the gun. the states version was cory the out the window and saw a team of police is coming at him, that he decided to take them on with a handgun that he shot and killed one of them and surrendered with the listen again. decide which of those those in areas hit by more plausible. basically he had a roach in his house that would lend him a $50 fine. he was charged and convicted of capital murder and sentenced to death. i was scared to the legal stuff that happened in between. eventually a couple years ago from his conviction was overturned by the mississippi supreme court. the prosecutors decided they would allow him to plead with manslaughter and he would get time served. at this point in prison for 10 years. at his homecoming party in mississippi, taking kids out for rides on his four wheeler and everybody's happ
i was even lower than a working bee. mississippi for the first part of the summer knowing that there was lots of talk about the march on washington, not knowing if it would ever come to be but mississippi was the last of the states where there had been no demonstrations. but not mississippi. halfway through the summer, i got a call saying "it's going to happen, eleanor. and buy yard is going to do it." he said, "come on up if you want to work on the staff." byyard us are on the. states who could have organized that march. >> ifill: what do you mean? >> there were a set of skills that we had no reason to have so nurtured. there had never been a mass march on washington that anyone. there had been all kind ofmarchs march. what would it take to organize such a march with no experience, no precedent to draw from. >> ifill: no social media, no flash mobs. with only telephones and the usual old-fashioned 20th century means of communication. on.l, first it took it took someone -- and i think buyard put it all in one. he had been a pass f.i.s.edworln civil disobedience in leavenwo
in mississippi. and i think part of it was that these young idealistic college students wanted to understand these people, not as abstractions, not as enemies, not as human beings and that's exactly why -- what agee accomplishes but the other thing they were drawn to was that it showed them how to live without armor. it showed them how to live according to the principles without compromise. i teach "let us now praise famous men," or try to do my freshman and they hate it. i don't care. [laughter] because there are a couple of every semester t who did it and it's worth it but it's worth it. and "let us now praise famous men," as many of yo you know, is a book that you can't get past the first few pages or it changes your life. and i think in the early '60s there were people who wanted to change, who were eager for the change. and "let us now praise famous men" really spoke to that. >> is it true, agee's reputation as you say, the book itself is a commercial and more or less political flaw but he did live in new york and he had friends, and some of them talked to them. irving howe, paul goodma
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